49 thoughts on “Roofing Tile Leak Repair – Tips, Tricks & Helpful Hints

  1. GR8WHITEC5

    Great video!! Thank you so much for uploading. A few questions…. 1. How did you know the length and width of the two needed panels to begin with? I see at 6:32 you layed them over the old rotted wood panels, but you didn’t explain how you know what sizes to get cut at Home Depot. Did you just measure from nail to nail? (is that the 48” to get the lip on each side?) 2. What tool did you use to make that cut in the old wood after you used the magic marker to outline your panels? 3. And with that tool, how did you ensure it only cut so far deep without destroying other parts of wood underneath? 4. Is the tool blade set for a certain depth, such as, ¼”? 5. What did you set yours at for this job? 6. You used 30 mil base felt paper: What kind of nails did you use to nail that down to your new panels? The head of the nail looks like it is the size of a quarter. Are those special nails or normal nails with nail caps to widen the spread to hold down the felt? (pause at 12:43, those aluminum looking caps). GREAT VIDEO!! You inspire me to tackle my roof that is experiencing the same damage. Thank you. Please respond so I know what to do.

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  2. Jeff Biss

    OK, Duster Dan, two questions:
    1. At 16:30, instead of or in addition to a dollop of sealant over the nail head, what about cutting an fitting a copper sheet that locks on the upper edge of the tile, fits the curve of the tile, and extends below the lower edge of the upper tile? I've had some sealant shrink a bit and worry about that.
    2. At about 17:00, what about drilling the hole out? I've had good luck doing that.

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  3. Renee

    What do you think of polybond G for underlayment? It's being recommended by potential roofer. The quote is not much more than one for 2 layers of 40 lb felt and they don't require any money til job is finished either. 30 yr warranty. Only roofing co. so far that doesnt require money up front. Is each tile supposed to be nailed? Because currently mine are not all nailed down.

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  4. Meir Kin

    thanks for the most informative video. I have the same tile roof. what do i do in the areas that meet a wall where the underlayment has already worn out but if I can get flashing above the tiles , i can prevent the water from slipping between the tile and the wall? How do i accomplish that?

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  5. Jim Arwood

    Hi Dan, thank you for posting this video. Very helpful. I am also in the Riverside Ca. area. I'm in the unfortunate situation where large sections of the felt paper on my roof have deteriorated. Luckily only a small leak before we caught it. The home was built in 1988. Bids from the contractors are torn between a whole new roof or just a lift and re-felt. What are your opinions? Does concrete tile wear out? Thanks!

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  6. Giovanni Di Matteo

    In my case I have a house with old fashioned fired clay U-shaped "barrel" tiles, with no nail holes. Would you recommend using premium underlayment in that case or should the U-tiles be glued down or something? Just curious how to do it right in this case. I prefer the antique barrel tiles for aesthetic reasons, as this is the traditional roofing for historic buildings in my area.

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  7. YJ Kim

    Hi Dan, great video. I was hoping to see how you took out the first tile. Your video makes it look easy, but I am having a hard time getting it started, having a hard time getting the first tile off.

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  8. Justin Prem

    Duster Dan, for the win. Man, you are the well spoken, patient roofing teacher that we all wish we had. Thank you so much for taking the time to share this info with us.

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  9. Jerry Ratajesak

    I have 4 x tiles that have a cracked that runs length wise and are not missing any pieces or are loose. Would it be okay to just run a bead of construction adhesive the length of the crack instead of replacing the tile?

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  10. Jerry Ratajesak

    I have 4 x tiles that have a cracked that runs length wise and are not missing any pieces or are loose. Would it be okay to just run a bead of construction adhesive the length of the crack instead of replacing the tile?

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  11. Mike Panklang

    Build/fix as fast as possible with the cheapest materials by incompetent workers. That is how most businesses work nowadays.
    If you lived in my city, I would always call you to fix my roofing problems. Glad to see someone take pride in their work.

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  12. Jerry Ratajesak

    Thank you for the video! I’m assuming that when you put the tiles back in place after repairing the water leak, you started with the bottom row and worked up to the last roll that you needed to glued, correct?

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  13. Mr. Theodore

    How can someone dislike this video? I've been a carpenter for 37 years and an independent contractor for 28 years, this man know exactly what he's doing, and he explained himself in a very professional way. Good job, sir.

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  14. 1954compass

    Thank you so much for this video and other info Dan. This roof system and leak location look identical to my own and this video gives me confidence that I can make these repairs myself. Much appreciated! George.

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  15. MySecretMessages

    Really wish you had shown how you first deconstructed that area of the barrel roof tile. In other words, how you removed them without breaking or cracking them. Cement tile roofs typically used in Florida seem to crack if you just look at them wrong. 🙂 Seem like if you jammed your crowbar up underneath another tile to try to pull up a nail, you would have two broken tiles. So I'm sure there is a trick. Also, the tiles you replace do not appear to be brand new (maybe they are spares?), so it appears you are putting back the originals.

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  16. N M

    Wow, this was awesome info…Awesome explanation & tips! FYI; the owners need to trim off those trees; that's a bridge for bugs.

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